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Wiggles of Excitement


“I have a wiggly tooth.” That is all–a simple statement of fact shared during a school day discussion. After spending time with Little Bud for virtual learning, I have learned that a loose tooth in the world of a six year old means the world. It is like breaking headline news and they cannot wait to share it with everyone they encounter. As they make these announcements, you can see the awe on the faces of their classmates and maybe even a certain degree of envy.

This wiggly tooth enthusiasm has me wondering–what are adults excited about? The new termite contract for our house came in lower than we expected. There is a big sale on Amazon and it includes stuff I actually need. I have a three-day weekend! Somehow when you put those all in a line they actually don’t seem as exciting as a first grader with a tooth that shakes and shimmies when they eat or talk.

So why are loose teeth such a milestone? I don’t really think it’s the prospect of a visit from the Tooth Fairy, although a magical lady delivering cash to your house in the night does sound exciting. Is it the novelty? Is it a sign to them that they are growing up? I honestly can’t answer that because I don’t even remember sharing that level of excitement when I was a child. Obviously, I lost teeth but that feeling has been buried among other childhood happenings. Also, now that I’m a “grown up” and have developed an unhealthy fear of the dentist, the thought of losing a tooth really turns my stomach. In fact, when Little Bud tries to share the latest updates on his wiggly tooth I can’t really even look. Where it inspires delight and hope among six year olds, this 40-something thinks it’s just plain gross! 

Blood and guts aside, one of the best things about being a mom is seeing the world through the eyes of your children. Think about it. The world is hard right now and things seem so dark and impossible. But wait, wait a minute, I have a wiggly tooth! For a few days there are endless updates on the “wiggliness” of that tooth. The anticipation builds and builds until finally out it pops. (Of course, some children, like Little Bud, yank out a wiggler well before they’re ready and others, like PMan, wait until the permanent tooth has literally grown in, pushing everything aside, before pulling out the tooth.)

In a way, these loose teeth remind us that life marches on, progress continues and there are still things to look forward to. I hope that passion and playfulness will stay with Little Bud and his friends long after their baby teeth are gone. In the meantime, now that I’m thinking about teeth, I’m reminded of PMan’s last dentist appointment where they advised us that he would definitely need braces. Oh no. Is tightening and twisting teeth as exciting as wiggling and pulling teeth?! I guess we’ll find out soon.

Reviews

1 Review
SCarter
Baton Rouge
Cute and Cool

This was a cute and cool post. Loose teeth and super exciting for my little one also. It's sweet to watch them and be part of the excitement. I love the squeal of delight the next morning when the tooth fairy has left some cash.

January 2021

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