Melvin “Ivan” B., IV and Andrew “Chubbs” A.


2018-19 Cover Kids and brothers, Melvin “Ivan” B., IV and Andrew “Chubbs” A., teamed up for our back-to-school photo shoot.

Known by his family and friends as Ivan the Great, Melvin, IV feels he has a calling to minister about Jesus Christ. Melvin, IV is on the Autism Spectrum and lives with dyslexia, ADHD, sensory processing disorder, and delayed processing disorder, but he advocates that though his struggles are real, he is comforted by God that “he can do all things through Christ because He strengthens him.” He’s also a member of the National Junior Beta Club and 100 Black Men.

When Andrew meets new people, he lets them know that his name is Chubbs. He’s spunky and has a love for gadgets and music. His mom shares that he lives with cerebral palsy and epilepsy, but he doesn’t let it hold him back. He’s also a Kids’ Orchestra and Cub Scout Pack 41 member.  

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30 Jul 2019


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